Medical Evidence

If you are submitting an Extenuating Circumstances Claim or an Appeal on the grounds of illness you will need to provide medical evidence. If you’re experiencing mental ill health you can find out more about getting support from UAL here. They may also be able to provide you with evidence if you submitting an EC, appeal or going through another UAL process.

It is important that the letter coming from your doctor supports as much of the information you will be putting in your form as possible. You should give your doctor a copy fo the UAL Guidance Note for Medical Practitioners, there's a link to this at the bottom of the page.

In particular, the letter should

  • include your name and the date the letter is written
  • be specific regarding the dates your illness affected you or if this is ongoing
  • note that, if this is an ongoing illness or disability, how it worsened during the specific period
  • include the issues you experienced, how these directly affected your ability to perform during that assessment
  • you can include any treatment you may be receiving

If you’re submitting an Appeal your letter should also explain why you were unable to submit a claim for Extenuating Circumstances before your exam board met.

Ordinarily, the University will not accept evidence gathered after the extenuating circumstances took place however if the circumstance is still affecting you then this may be acceptable.

The University cannot accept evidence from practitioners of alternative medicine. All evidence must be translated into English and notarised.  You can find a list of approved translators here.

What can the Arts SU Advice Service do for me during the UAL Appeals process?

  • Advise you on what your doctor will need to include
  • Read over any evidence you have and help you decide if it’s enough

Get in touch

Email

Drop-in

Telephone

Appointments

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advice@su.arts.ac.uk

10am-12pm - Monday to Friday - 272 High Holborn, WC1V 7EY

020 7514 6270

Upon request

Other links

UAL Guidance Note for Medical Practitioners

*Correct as of September 2018